Author: Jennifer Ferreira

Recycling Programmes: How Coffee Shops Engage in the Circular Economy

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The phenomenal growth of coffee shops (in the UK, but also globally) has consequently meant a rise in energy consumption and the production of waste. It’s estimated that 500,000 tonnes of coffee waste is produced in the UK each year, and 7 million disposable coffee cups each day. It is estimated that less than 1% of these coffee cups are recycled. After the issue reached the mainstream media last year as part of Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall’s ‘war on waste’ there have been many developments.

One of the most common ways in which coffee shops engage in the circular economy is [Sign in to continue]

Considering the ‘Coffice Economy’

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This is a new piece of research which highlights another important function of café spaces – as places not only of co-working for independent workers, but as places where business and work takes place more generally.

The discount voucher website MyVoucherCodes has recently released some data which suggests that:

4/5 people in the UK have spent at least 3 ½ hours working from a coffee shop each week;
1/3 have closed a business deal (with an average value of [sign in to continue]

Coffee Culture and Specialty Coffee in the Middle East

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Last month, Trade Arabia announced that Coffee Planet, a coffee roaster and coffee shop chain in the Middle East, signed a franchise agreement with HB Brands for 70 shops in Saudi Arabia. Coffee Planet, based in Dubai, embarked on the franchise concept in order to expand its global presence, adding to its existing franchise agreements in UAE, Qatar, Pakistan and Malaysia.

There are changes taking place in Middle Eastern coffee culture [Sign in to continue]

Exploring Coffee and Cafe Culture in Portugal

Exploring Coffee and Cafe Culture in Portugal

Coffee culture is ingrained in the everyday life, culture and history of Portugal. The Portuguese were crucial actors in expanding the coffee industry into what it is today with Portuguese colonists introducing the coffee plant to Brazil. There isn’t space here to explore the rich history of Portuguese coffee culture, but I will write about this more at some point soon.

Drinking coffee in Portugal is an everyday part of life, with cafés found almost on every street, and espresso being the most common drink.  Coffee is significantly cheaper to drink out of the home, than it is in the UK. An espresso wouldn’t usually cost you more than € 1 and in most cases is closer to € 0.50. If you ask for a coffee (um café) an espresso is what you’d be served, although there are regional variations for different coffees too. If you were in Porto and wanted an espresso you’d order um bica, while in Lisbon you’d order um cimbalino (named after the La Cimbali espresso machines). [Sign in to continue]